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At construction sites in Pennsylvania, there are often many construction workers performing different types of work. For instance, there may be sheet metal workers laying down metal on the top of a building. There may be roofers working on the building roofs. With all the activity on a construction site, accidents often occur. One type of accident that may occur is falling objects.

At any given construction site, it is not uncommon to have workers performing work from heights. It is also not uncommon to have workers working on levels directly below those working on higher levels. Those workers on the lower or ground level are often at risk of injury from objects falling from the upper level. Such things may include power tools, building materials, debris, etc.

When workers are injured while on the job, they may sustain catastrophic injuries. For instance, a Philadelphia construction site worker hit in the head by a falling power tool from the upper level may sustain a traumatic brain injury. A worker working from a scaffold hit by a falling object may lose his balance, fall off the scaffold and sustain multiple broken bones.

When PA workers are injured while on the job, they have rights to file workers’ compensation claims and may have rights to file third party liability cases.

Recovery by Our Construction Accident Lawyers$13 million for workers injured due to the collapse of the Philadelphia Kimmel Center. See more case results by our work injury lawyer.

PA Workers’ Compensation – Medical Benefits & Wage Loss

PA injured workers are entitled to receive medical benefits due to work injuries via worker’s compensation. There are no co-pays or deductibles. Medical expenses are covered 100%. However, it is important for injured workers to know that medical expenses are only covered if they are treated by doctors approved by the workers’ compensation carrier. In addition, the workers’ compensation carrier must find that the medical treatments are related to the work accident and injury. Therefore, if an injured worker sees a doctor that is not approved by the workers’ compensation carrier or if a medical treatment is not approved or deemed necessary by the workers’ compensation carrier, then the medical expenses are not covered by workers’ compensation.

In addition to medical benefits, injured workers who are unable to work are eligible to receive lost wages. However, workers do not receive 100% of their lost wages; they only receive a portion of their lost pay. See Pennsylvania Work Accidents & Claims for Lost Pay/Wages (Part 1)

Third Party Tort Claims

In addition to filing a workers’ compensation claim, a worker who was injured by a falling object may be able to file a lawsuit against a third party who was negligent and caused the accident, such as a subcontractor or vendor on the site. In PA work injury lawsuits, the injured worker (plaintiff) can make a claim for all medical bills and lost wages (even those already paid by the workers’ compensation carrier) and pain and suffering damages. In the event the claim is successful, the injured worker is usually required to repay the workers’ compensation carrier most of what it paid out on the claim; this is known as a right of subrogation or workers’ compensation lien.

Compensation After Getting Hurt by a Falling Object

Our experienced work accident and compensation lawyers in PA and NJ handle accidents caused by falling objects on PA worksites or construction sites. We also handle other work place accidents such as electrocutions, fall accidents and forklift accidents. We have the experience and resources to help you recover the best result possible for your work accident in PA and NJ.

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