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  • Over $100 Million for Injured Workers in Pennsylvania & New Jersey


    Work & Construction Accident Lawyers

    Jeff Laffey  •  Paul Bucci  •  Brian Kent

  • What Our Clients Say


    “I have the utmost respect for Brian, Jeff, and Paul. They left a positive mark on my life.”


    “I would highly recommend your office to others. Everyone in the office is a true professional."

  • Results Matter in Your Injury Case


    $9 million - Pennsylvania Auto Accident

    $3 million - Philadelphia Surgical Malpractice

    $2.75 million - Slip & Fall Accident

Mar 062017
 

Each year, hundreds of New Jersey residents are injured in on the job work accidents including construction accidents, equipment accidents and fall accidents.

According to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were over 93,000 nonfatal work injury cases reported in 2015. In addition, there were 97 total work related fatalities in 2015.

Related: New Jersey Worker Dies After Electric Shock, Fall From Ladder, Employer Gets 5 OSHA Citations (January 11, 2017)

Based on this data, for every 1,000 work accidents that occur in the state of New Jersey, there is one fatal accident. Fatal accident data in 2015 reveals the following:

  • 37 transportation industry related deaths,
  • 24 deaths due to falls (falls from heights, slip and falls and trip and falls),
  • 18 deaths due to violence,
  • 11 deaths due to contact with objects (these usually involve equipment accidents),
  • 7 deaths due to chemical/environmental exposures.

Serious Work Accidents – Injuries & Financial Compensation

Let’s face it. Workers’ compensation benefits just aren’t enough to help a seriously injured worker in New Jersey. While medical treatment bills are covered, payments for a temporary or permanent disability max out at 70% of the gross weekly wage, up to $871 in 2016 or $896 in 2017. For most New Jersey families, this is hardly enough to keep the lights on.

For example, a worker who earns $750 (gross) per week is injured in a work accident and suffers a temporary disability. Based on the 2017 numbers, the most the injured worker can receive is $525 per week.

Here’s another example. A worker who earns $1,500 (gross) per week and is injured in a work accident would only be able to receive $896 per week.

NJ residents who are seriously injured due to work accidents often lose weeks or even months from work. In the most serious cases, a lifelong disability prevents an injured worker from ever returning to work. How does an injured worker in New Jersey ensure that his or her family is protected from financial ruin?

One thing many injured workers don’t do is seek legal advice immediately after a work accident occurs. A qualified work accident lawyer can determine whether there is a valid lawsuit to pursue. This can help an injured worker to obtain full compensation for lost wages, out of pocket expenses and even pain and suffering.

For example, a New Jersey resident is injured while servicing a piece of equipment at a factory in South Jersey. His hand gets caught in the machine, causing a serious crush injury that results in an amputation. The injured worker consults with a work accident lawyer who discovers that the machine was defective. A defective product injury lawsuit is filed and the injured worker later recovers financial compensation, over and above workers’ compensation benefits.

This example shows how New Jersey workers can get full compensation for their work injuries. If you would like to speak to one of our work accident lawyers, please call us at 609.223.8900. Our New Jersey offices are located in Atlantic City, Cherry Hill and Iselin.

DISCLAIMER: This website does not create any attorney-client relationship or provide legal advice. It is crucial to speak to a qualified lawyer prior to making any decision about your case. Read full disclaimer at the bottom of this page.